<%@LANGUAGE="JAVASCRIPT" CODEPAGE="65001"%> 6/17/08 Mosaic Table

 

On the left is a bowl of wormy American Chestnut, a wood that is extinct due to the blight of the 1920s.  This piece spent a century or so as barn beam.  On the right is a bowl of Heartpine, which comes from the Long Leaf Pine trees.  Because these trees take 3 to 4 hundred years to mature, they were not replanted after harvesting, and by 1900, all but 5% of America's great Long Leaf Pines had been harvested.  In the 1700's, King George laid claim to all of these pines with diameters larger than 24 inches.  His people would mark them to be harvested with arrows.  The colonists, not liking this much, would tar and feather the King's men.  Some say that this was a precursor to the Boston Tea Party that would come later.  This is another piece of wood that has spent many years in the structure of a barn.  I chose veneers of red, white and blue to honor these early-American woods as well, American.

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Two bowls of Lacewood.

Left one is SOLD

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These two bowls are made of Redwood burls.

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This is my favorite.  It's a piece of Spalted Pecan with five different kinds of veneer.  It came from a gentleman down in Alabama who cut this tree down after it was struck with lightning. 

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On the left is the Spalted Pecan.  On the right, I turned another piece of the Ancient Kauri from New Zealand.  This is the wood that has been carbon dated to be 30,000 to 50,000 years old.  It shimmers.

the Kauri bowl is SOLD

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